UNH Hosts Post-Presidential Election Discussion with Political Scientists Nov. 8

UNH Hosts Post-Presidential Election Discussion with Political Scientists Nov. 8

Thursday, November 1, 2012

Andy Smith

Andy Smith, associate professor of political science and director of the UNH Survey Center.

Dante Scala

Dante Scala, associate professor of political science and regular tweeter at @graniteprof.

There is a lot at stake in the Nov. 6 election. Who will be the next president? Which party will control Congress? Who will New Hampshire’s next governor be, and which party will control the State House?

Two days after the acceptance and concession speeches have concluded, University of New Hampshire political scientists Dante Scala and Andy Smith will dissect election night and try to make sense of what happened in the Nov. 6 election, both nationwide and statewide.

“What Happened? A Post-Election Discussion with Dante Scala and Andy Smith,” kicks off at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 in the Memorial Union Building Strafford Room.

Both national political experts on presidential elections, Scala, associate professor of political science and regular tweeter at @graniteprof, and Smith, associate professor of political science and director of the UNH Survey Center, will share their insights and answer questions from the audience. The discussion will be moderated by Tom Haines, assistant professor of English, a journalist and regular tweeter at @twhaines.

Although New Hampshire has just four electoral votes, it is seen as a key battleground state in the race for president. Both the campaigns of President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney have stepped up their efforts here in recent weeks with visits by the candidates and high-profilesurrogates as well as increased advertising. Romney has chosen New Hampshire for the final rally of his campaign, with an event in Manchester on Monday night.

This event is part of the 2012-13 University Dialogue. The topic this year is “Live Free or Die? A University Dialogue on Freedom and Responsibility.” The University Dialogue serves as a theme throughout the year to focus community events and conversations on an area of broad interest, a big question or an enduring problem. The theme is set by students, faculty and staff and the Discovery Program but serves as a rallying call in hopes that many organizations, offices and departments will choose to engage.

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