Attention Armchair Travellers

Attention Armchair Travellers

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Student Photo Contest Needs Your Vote

CIE photo contest

Places, People, and Cultural Immersion, vote for your favorite photos >>

Feel like seeing another part of the world but can’t find the time to travel just now?

Check out the UNH Center for International Education (CIE) Fall 2012 Photo Contest. You’ll be transported across continents and oceans to places ranging from the Palais des Papes in Provence, France, to the Temple of the Sun in Peten, Guatemala, to the Sahara Desert in Morocco. And after you’ve enjoyed your armchair travels, you can vote for your favorite photos by “liking” them on Facebook before the contest ends on Oct. 17.

“It gives you a representation of where UNH students are studying abroad,” says Wen Houle, who coordinates the contest for CIE. “These places are interesting – and they also provide academically enriching experiences that have the power to transform students’ UNH education as well as their lives.”

The contest is a twice-yearly UNH tradition going back at least a decade, Houle says. This fall, students returning from spring and summer study abroad programs submitted 79 photos in three categories: people, places, and cultural immersion. They capture scenes in Ghana, Russia, Costa Rica, Spain, Italy, China, New Zealand, Australia, and Hungary, among other countries. Though the winner in each category gets a monetary award, any of the pictures may be used on the CIE website or in promotional materials. Dimond Library features photos from previous contests in its second-floor photo gallery.

The competition is popular with students, who begin sending submissions as soon as it opens, Houle says. “It’s a great way for them to showcase one aspect of their study abroad.”

Want to learn more about the story behind the photo? Short profiles of contest winners will appear in UNH Today, so your vote counts! View the photos.

Originally published by: 

UNH Today

Written by Sonia Scherr ’13MFA

Headlines

  • As an occupational therapist, Tracey Ellis ’93 is trained to solve problems.

     So when her Washington, D.C.-based Ellis Therapeutic Consultants began delivering occupational therapy (OT) to American families living abroad and was quickly overwhelmed with work, she found a solution some in the high-touch field of OT might find surprising.

     She took her services online.