Off the Beaten Path - Central UNH Campus Tour Guide

A Self-Guided Tour of UNH

This guide is designed to be a self-guided tour of the UNH campus.  For your convenience the attractions have been placed into three categories:

      Central Campus:  within easy walking distance from any core campus building.

       Extended Campus: a short 10 to 15 minute walk from the core campus.  Areas are grouped by proximity.

      Regional: Attractions that are located in the areas surrounding campus.

Note: Hours at each location are subject to change.

Central Campus

Dimond Library

Information:

            The UNH Dimond Library is a member of the Boston Library Consortium which through interlibrary loan, gives UNH students, faculty, and staff access to a combined collection of more than 31 million volumes from some of the most well-known research institutions in the nation including: MIT, the Marine Biological Laboratory/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, the Boston Public Library and many more.  The library collections holds 2.1 million volumes, Microform Units: 2.5 million, Audio, Film, and Video: 23,106, Government Documents: 735,000 & Maps: 57,800.

Hours:

     7:30 am to 2 am, Monday - Thursday

     7:30 am to 12 am, Friday

     10 am to 12 am, Saturday

     10 am to 2 am, Sunday

http://www.library.unh.edu/

 

University Museum at Dimond Library

Information:

            The University Museum features UNH history through a variety of photos, documents, artifacts, and memorabilia drawn from the collections of both the museum and University archives. Rotating exhibitions explore and illustrate the history of a small agricultural college turned research university. Having been around for more than 130 years, its collection shows the growth of the university.

            The Museum was first located in Hanover in 1866 as a State Museum of General and Applied Science. In 1923, the museum moved with the University to Durham, taking residence in Thompson Hall. It later moved to the field house in 1951 due to a growing collection. Its first curator was Phil Wilcox, and by the time he had retired in 1973 the museum was comprised of six rooms in total. A combination of budgeting and space issues caused the museum to be put into storage in 1976. However, generous donations from several alumni classes made its 1998 move to the Dimond library, its current home, possible.

Location: Level 1, Dimond Library

Hours/Availability

During the fall and spring semesters, the museum is open to the public:

     10 am to 4 pm, Monday - Friday

     12 pm to 4 pm, Saturday

Between semesters (semester break and during summer):

     10 am to 4 pm, Monday - Friday

Small tours and school groups are asked to make prior arrangements. The museum is closed on all University holidays.

http://www.izaak.unh.edu/museum/general.htm

 

Milne Special Collection & Archives at Dimond Library

Information:

            Special Collections opened in 1974. It now contains nearly 100,000 published items, which include early New Hampshire imprints, state documents, maps, local and town histories, town reports, and New Hampshire legal materials.                                  

            Notable holdings in Special Collections include the Douglas M. and Helena McElwain Milne Angling Collection, the Lewis Stark Early New Hampshire Imprint Collection, the Gareth and Janet Dunleavy Chaucer Collection, the New Hampshire Libraries of Traditional Music and Dance and Traditional Jazz, and the German-expatriate photographer Lotte Jacobi. Also an addition to Special Collections is a copy of Good News from a Far Country (1756), the first book published in New Hampshire.

            The department also acquires, preserves, and makes available research collections of both published and original source materials, particularly those related to the Granite State and to the University of New Hampshire. Special Collections focuses on rare books, manuscripts, recordings, and artifacts. The University Archives houses University records of permanent administrative, legal, fiscal, and historical value.

Location:  Level 1, Dimond Library

Hours/Availability:

     10 am to 4 pm, Monday - Friday

     12 pm to 4 pm, Saturday

     Closed Sundays

http://www.library.unh.edu/milne/

 

Map Collection at Dimond Library

Information:

            The non-circulating map collection has more than 55,000 USGS topographic maps, nautical charts, and other map series including CD-ROM and Internet versions.

Location: Level 3 (Main Floor) and Level 1, Dimond Library

Hours/Availability

Hours:

     7:30 am to 2 am, Monday - Thursday

     7:30 am to 12 am, Friday

     10 am to 12 am, Saturday

     10 am to 2 am, Sunday

http://www.library.unh.edu/find/government-information

 

UNH Museum of Art

Information:

            The Museum of Art serves as a visual arts center for the University, the seacoast, and the state. Exhibitions range from historical to contemporary art. A permanent collection of more than 1,500 works is utilized for teaching and exhibitions. The Museum’s Outreach Program fosters appreciation for art among youth. Children receive guided tours from trained volunteers. Teachers may also borrow curriculum-enhancement materials from a library of more than 350 slide units and videos on artists, artistic styles, and historic themes. In addition, weekly ArtBreak program lectures, gallery walks by artists, intimate concerts, poetry readings, and demonstrations are offered. Exhibitions and most events are free.

Location:  Paul Creative Arts Center

Hours/Availability:

Open September through May:

     10 am - 4 pm, Monday– Wednesday

     10 am - 8 pm, Thursday

     1 pm - 5 pm, Saturday and Sunday

(Closed Fridays, University holidays, and during exhibition changes as well as during the summer.)

http://www.unh.edu/moa/visit.html

 

Little Red Wagon Sculpture

Information:

            The Little Red Wagon Sculpture represents the vehicle that the UNH student theatre group uses to travel to camps, libraries, recreation centers, schools, hospitals, churches, etc. throughout New England doing performances for children. The Little Red Wagon is the longest running nonprofit, children’s theatre tour in the U.S. Since 1971 the wagon has performed throughout New England at more than 70 locations every summer. The Little Red Wagon is a grass-roots model program for the state of New Hampshire, and was instrumental to the introduction of Theatre Education into the public school system as a supportive tool for reading and learning.

Location:  Behind the Johnson Theatre / Paul Creative Arts building.

Hours/Availability:

     Always available

http://www.unh.edu/theatre-dance/index.cfm?id=49F2EA69-A916-EC4A-C1E54CD204C164A6

 

UNH Insect Collection

Information:

            The College of Life Sciences and Agriculture maintains New England’s third largest insect collection containing more than 600,000 specimens. Materials from the collection are used by researchers from around the world, and for presentations about insect biology. The collection is also used to assist in identification of insects by the Arthropod Identification Clinic, a group of entomologists providing identifications to the public for a fee of $5 per insect (price may vary).

Location:  Spaulding Hall

Hours/Availability:

     Can be viewed by appointment only. Call (603) 862-1735.

 

Memorial Union Building

Information:

            The Memorial Union Building (“The MUB”) is New Hampshire’s official State War Memorial. The building also operates as a comprehensive conference, entertainment, and gathering center for the UNH campus and community. The MUB houses such facilities as the University Bookstore, copy center, a variety of food vendors, two movie theaters, game rooms, a complete selection of function facilities, and offices for most of UNH's Student Organizations.

Location:  Between parking lot C and Hood House

Hours/Availability:

     7 am to 12 am, Monday - Thursday

     7 am to 1 am, Friday

     10 am to 1 am, Saturday

     4 pm to 12 am, Sunday

http://www.unhmub.com

 

War Memorial Room at the Memorial Union Building

Information:

            The University of New Hampshire’s Memorial Union Building is the host of the state’s memorial to all those New Hampshire citizens who lost their lives fighting in foreign wars. The Memorial Room is used as a reflection room that "honors all New Hampshire residents who perished while in military action from World War I through present day."

            The main feature of this room is the 24-panel window was the first of its kind when it was made and installed in 1957. In full color, and of abstract design, it differs from traditional decorative windows in that its color and design have been applied to clear glass (as opposed to the use of pre-colored or stained glass) and in that the window is made entirely of shatter-proof safety glass. The late Professor emeritus, John Hatch was commissioned to design and paint the window.

Location: Level 3, Memorial Union Building

Hours/Availability:

     See MUB hours above

http://unhmub.com/memorial/

 

“A Century in Progress: A Photographic Exhibit of Women’s History at the University of New Hampshire” at the Memorial Union Building

Information:

            “A Century of Progress: A Photographic Exhibit of Women at UNH” documents the role of women at the university from 1891, when Lucy Swallow enrolled as the first female student, to today, when more than half of the student population is women.

            In addition to looking at the student experience, the exhibit documents the first female assistant professors in 1913 and the fact that since 1995 half of the university’s higher administration positions have been held by women. The nine thematic panels illustrate women’s initiatives, struggles and accomplishments from the late 19th century to the new millennium. Their stories demonstrate how this college, which initially perceived education primarily as a male domain, became a university that welcomes the presence, participation, and influence of women.

            The project was sponsored by The Center for the Humanities. It was a gift from the Class of 1950 with support from the UNH Alumni Association, the departments of History, Women’s Studies, and Family Studies, the Affirmative Action office, Intercollegiate Athletics, the President’s Commission on the Status of Women, and anonymous donors.

Location:  Level 3, Living Room, Memorial Union Building

Hours/Availability:

     See MUB hours above

 

WUNH 91.3 FM at the Memorial Union Building

Information:

            WUNH is a noncommercial radio station operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The station has an estimated 50-mile broadcast radius. WUNH features more than 30 scheduled programs specializing in a variety of musical genres including polka, oldies, rap, metal, and ethnic. A program guide is published every semester and distributed to area music outlets and community businesses. WUNH is a college/community station. Public service announcements and programming ideas are welcome. Training is provided for new disc jockeys and volunteers.

Location:  Level 1, Memorial Union Building

Hours/Availability:

     9 am to 4 pm, Monday - Friday

http://wunh.org

 

Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory

Information:

            The New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory is staffed to diagnose infectious and contagious diseases of animals and to identify those animal diseases that may pose a threat to human health. Services, which include animal autopsies, histology, and microbiology, are available via referral by practicing veterinarians. Poultry and agriculture specimens may be submitted directly by owners. Staff veterinarians may be contacted by citizens to answer questions about animal diseases of public health significance. Veterinary pathology services are available to biomedical industry clients on a contract basis.

Location:  Kendall Hall

Hours/Availability:

     Appointments must be made at (603) 862-2726.

 

Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS)

Information:

            The Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) examines the forces controlling the universe and shaping life on Earth through quantitative studies and state-of-the-art understanding of Earth and space science. Home to more than 200 faculty, staff, and graduate students, the institute is a major international research center and the largest institute at UNH. EOS faculty members are recognized by their peers as leaders in the national and international scientific community, and their research is among the most frequently cited.

            Student and faculty research at EOS is interdisciplinary by design and is cultivated by four linked research centers: the Complex Systems Research Center (CSRC), the Climate Change Research Center (CCRC), the Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory (OPAL), and the Space Science Center (SSC). In these centers, EOS scientists study all aspects of the Earth’s biogeochemical system and investigate solar-terrestrial interactions and high energy processes in the universe.

            EOS researchers provide and operate major instruments on NASA satellites and aircraft studying Earth and space. Our researchers, faculty, staff, and students have expertise in space science, solar terrestrial theory, engineering, atmospheric chemistry, ocean dynamics and chemistry, biogeochemistry, climate change, paleoclimatology, forest and wetland ecology, hydrology, marine science, and remote sensing of terrestrial and ocean ecosystems. Project collaborations are local to international in scope.

            EOS faculty can be found in the pages of Science and Nature, on Capitol Hill briefing policymakers on major science issues, and with students on the ice sheets of Greenland, in a submersible three miles beneath the ocean’s surface, following forest fires in Brazil, creating instruments for spacecraft, and studying data from the latest space missions. EOS is UNH’s largest research enterprise, receiving more than $30 million each year in external research support. The university is consistently ranked among the top U.S. schools in National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) funding in a large part due to the multitude of EOS projects funded by the agency.

Location:  Morse Hall

Hours/Availability:

     9 am to 5 pm, Monday - Friday for a building walk-thru.

For inquiries with specific interest call (603) 862-3484 to make an appointment.

http://www.eos.unh.edu/contact/contact.shtml

 

Dairy Bar Restaurant

Information:

            The Dairy Bar is housed in the old Durham Railroad Station house. The Dairy Bar serves breakfast, lunch, and ice cream.

Location:  3 Depot Road at the Railroad Station

Hours/Availability:

During the Academic Year:

     8 am to 9 pm, Monday - Friday

     11 am to 9 pm, Saturday and Sunday

(For the most up to date hours, check the UNH Dining Website or call (603) 862 - 1006)

http://www.unh.edu/dairy-bar/

 

Elliott Alumni Center

Information:

            As well as being the link to the University for the many alumni of UNH, the Alumni Center provides resources that are available to current students as well. The Alumni Center is an important aspect of the UNH campus, as it connects UNH students’ University student life and University alumni life. The Alumni Association awards several financial-need scholarships annually to UNH students. There are three categories of scholarships that students may apply for. The Alumni Association also provides free life insurance to new alumni after their first year of graduation from UNH.

Location:  Edgewood Road

Hours/Availability:

     8 am to 4:30pm, Monday - Friday

https://www.alumni.unh.edu/

 

Wildcat Sculpture

Information:

            Artist Matthew Gray Palmer was selected from a field of over 40 artists to design and model a bronze wildcat sculpture. This is the University’s first official public art commission and is a project of the UNH Alumni Association and Athletics department, in collaboration with the University Committee for Campus Aesthetics. Initial funding for the sculpture was made possible through a gift from the Edward and Selma Bacon Simon Fund. These funds have since been augmented by alumni donations and a UNH Parent’s Association funding of $25,000.  To see more work by this artist, go to www.mathewgraypalmer.com

Location:  In front of the Whittemore Center

Hours/Availability:

     Always available

http://www.izaak.unh.edu/archives/history/mascot/wildcatsculpture.shtml

 

“Atomic Age” Mural by John Hatch

Information:

            Painted by renowned UNH art professor John Hatch, the mural depicts the double-edged sword of nuclear power, with violent images of war on the left side of the sword and peaceful images on the right. Painted in the 1950’s, the mural is an important symbol of the college and was moved and preserved during the Kingsbury Hall renovations.

Location: South Entrance of Kingsbury Hall

Hours/Availability:

     Always available - Kingsbury Hall is open 24/7

http://www.unh.edu/news/campusjournal/2006/may/052406mural.html

 

Historical Relief Map of Northern New England

Information:

            The Historical Geological Topography Map of Northern New England is an eye-catching centerpiece of the recently restored James Hall, home of UNH’s Earth sciences department. The recently restored map has an instructional tool since 1929. 

            The map is a unique 1878 wooden New Hampshire geological relief map by Charles H. Hitchcock. Hitchcock spent a decade mapping New Hampshire, Vermont, and eastern Maine by foot, horse, and railroad. Because the state at the time was largely unforested, Hitchcock’s surveys were remarkably accurate.  He was allocated $200 by the New Hampshire General Court to produce the relief map and worked on it from 1871 to 1890 at Dartmouth College, where he was a professor before coming to UNH. Charles H. Hitchcock (1836-1919) served as New Hampshire State Geologist from 1868 to 1878.

            The Hitchcock map came to UNH’s Thompson Hall in 1894. The map, which was the first of three relief maps of New Hampshire, is at a horizontal scale of one inch to one mile, with its vertical scale exaggerated 500 percent. Constructed of laminated half-inch thick boards cut and glued on top of each other, it weighs nearly 1.5 tons and was moved in three pieces. In addition to 40 color-coded rock types, the map showcases bodies of water and mines that were active when the map was created. Geographic features like the boundaries and names of nearly 570 towns and major roadways reflect 1870s New England.  The UNH Parents Association provided a grant for the project.

Location: North Entrance of James Hall, Stairwell

Hours/Availability:

     8:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday- Friday

To view a video of the map restoration, go to http://vimeo.com/8972779 ; for an Campus Journal article about the map go to http://unh.edu/news/campusjournal/2010/Aug/18map.cfm