Advisors

Guy Crosby is the Science Editor for Cook’s Illustrated Magazine and America’s Test Kitchen. He began working with the magazine as a consulting editor in early 2005. Guy is also a full-time associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Food Science at Framingham State College, and an adjunct associate professor of nutrition with the Harvard School of Public Health.

Mary Ann Esposito is the creator and host of the PBS series, Ciao Italia, televised nationally and internationally. This year the series celebrates its milestone 20th year, making it the longest running cooking series on television. Mary Ann holds a masters degree in food history from the University of New Hampshire.

David M. Eisenberg is the Director of the Osher Research Center at Harvard Medical School and the Division for Research and Education in Complementary and Integrative Medical Therapies and the Director of the Program in Integrative Medicine at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital. He is also the Bernard Osher Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Eisenberg is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School.

Anthony Flaccavento is an organic farmer who lives near Abingdon, Virginia, in the heart of Appalachian Virginia.  He founded Appalachian Sustainable Development in 1995 and served as its Executive Director through November, 2009. Under his leadership, ASD grew to national prominence for its work to build sustainable economic development systems, infrastructure and markets.  Anthony also founded SCALE, Inc., a private consulting business dedicated to catalyzing and supporting ecologically healthy regional economies and food systems.

Mollie Katzen, with over 6 million books in print, is listed by the New York Times as one of the best-selling cookbook authors of all time. A 2007 inductee into the prestigious James Beard Cookbook Hall of Fame, and largely credited with moving healthful vegetarian food from the "fringe" to the center of the American dinner plate, Ms. Katzen has been named by Health Magazine as one of "The Five Women Who Changed the Way We Eat."

Sam Hayward is the chef and an owner of Fore Street in Portland, Maine. During his more than thirty years cooking Maine food in Maine restaurants, he has fostered a community of cooks, farmers, fishers, and artisan producers who share his passion for local, sustainable, best-quality, secure food resources, from both land and sea. In 2004 and 2011, Sam was named Best Chef-Northeast by the James Beard Foundation.

Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. Kummer's recent book, The Pleasures of Slow Food, celebrates local artisans who raise and prepare the foods of their regions with the love and expertise that come only with generations of practice. Over the course of his prolific career, Kummer has won no fewer than five James Beard Foundation Journalism Awards, including the MFK Fisher Distinguished Writing Award. And less than a year after its launch, the Atlantic Food Channel was nominated for a National Magazine Award as “Best Magazine Department on the Internet.”

Frances Moore Lappé is a democracy advocate and world food and hunger expert who has authored or co-authored 16 books. She is the co-founder of three organizations, including Food First: The Institute for Food and Development Policy and, more recently, the Small Planet Institute, which she leads with her daughter Anna Lappé.

Jay McSharry is a successful restaurateur based in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Over the past decade, he worked as the owner and operator of popular establishments including Jumpin’ Jay’s Fish Café, Dos Amigos  Burritos, The Red Door, Radici, 106 Kitchen and Bar, and The Dunaway Restaurant at Strawbery Banke. Jay has received acclaim for his innovation to the Portsmouth dining scene. In 2006, The Dunaway received national recognition when its chef was named by Food & Wine Magazine to its esteemed “Best New Chefs” list.

Eric Rimm is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health and an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He is the Director of the Program in Cardiovascular Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. His research is focused on the health effects of alcohol, micronutrients,  antioxidants and fatty acids and also on plasma and genetic markers of heart disease.

Jennifer Wilkins is a Senior Extension Associate in the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University where her work since 1993 has focused on the linkages between human, environmental, and community health through sustainable food systems. Jennifer conceptualized and developed the first regional food guide in the United States – the Northeast Regional Food Guide.