Workshops

DCYF Core Academy | Specialized Training | Online Training | Other Training Oppurtunities

For upcoming training dates, times, and locations, please refer to the training calendar.

DCYF Core Academy

DCYF Core Academy is required for all newly-hired Child Protective Services (CPS), Juvenile Probation and Parole (JPP), and Sununu Youth Services Center (SYSC) staff within the first 6 months of employment. The DCYF Core Academy tiered training matrix is shown below. Required trainings are listed for each of 3 tracks: CPS, JPP, and SYSC. Enrollment instructions are provided at the bottom of the matrix.

printer icon Click here to download the DCYF Core Academy tiered training matrix. (Note: This is a legal-size document.)

printer icon Click here to download the DCYF Core Academy FAQ.

DCYF Core Academy Tiered Training Matrix

Specialized Training

Specialized Training provides a more advanced level to essential child welfare practice knowledge. These trainings are developed and identified to meet the specific needs of DCYF Staff. Needs are assessed using annual individual assessments, field surveys, current research and best practice. Pending availability, Department of Health and Human Services personnel and outside providers are also invited to attend.

Past Specialized trainings have included:

  • Drug Recognition and Awareness
  • 3-5-7 Model: Preparing Youth for Permanency - Life Stories Matter
  • Connect: Youth Suicide Prevention
  • Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) Training
  • Overview of Child Sexual Abuse
  • Case Practice Review: Reviewer Training
  • CASA/DCYF Meet & Greet
  • Building Resiliency: How the Helping Professional Can Fight the Frazzle

Online Training

Online Training links currently available are listed below (click on a title to go to the website of the organization hosting the training). If you have questions regarding these or any other online trainings that may be available, please contact one of CPE's educational program coordinators. To receive credit for any training listed below, print out and complete an Action Plan (if required) and send it together with the completed 'Knowledge Check' to CPE via fax (271-4737),  email, or interoffice mail. If you notice any broken or expired training links, please contact Pam Seufert via email (pam.seufert@unh.edu) or call 271-4732:

  • Burnout During Trying Times (This self-guided training is part of a series of trainings designed by students in the University of New Hampshire's Master of Social Work program and is based on current research and recognized best practices. This course will discuss the effects of fiscal pressures in child welfare and the accompanying risk of staff burnout. Learners will understand the role that budgetary austerity plays in workplace burnout and/or stress.  In addition, learners will understand how unaddressed burnout impacts service delivery in child welfare.  Finally, the course will discuss methods that staff and supervisors can use to minimize burnout. This training provides 1 hour of credit.)
      • Please review the accompanying handout below. 
      • Print out and complete the Knowledge Check. Note that a minimum of 8 of the 10 questions must be answered correctly to receive credit for this course.
  • Case Management and Monitoring of Psychotropic Medications (This training is offered and made possible by the Administration for Children and Famlies. Course Objectives: Understand the existing evidence-base for psychiatric medications for traumatized youth; Learn about emerging research on psychiatric medication practice trends in child welfare systems; Develop critical thinking skills in regards to the use of psychiatric medications for maltreated youth. This training provides 2 hours of credit.)
  • Engaging Fathers in Child Welfare (This training is offered and made possible by the University of Minnesota - Center for Advanced Studies in Child Welfare. Father engagement is an important yet underdeveloped aspect of child welfare work. Both in the U.S. and internationally, child welfare work has traditionally focused on the mother-child dyad. This module aims to underscore the importance of father engagement by presenting research findings on this topic from studies involving child welfare practitioners and fathers. Father engagement and involvement as a prevention framework for child welfare agencies and systems is also presented, as is new global research on strategies for engaging fathers. This training provides 1.5 hours of credit.)
      • Print out and complete the Knowledge Check. Note that a minimum of 8 of the 10 questions must be answered correctly to receive credit for this course.
  • Evidence-Based Treatments for Ethnic Minority Youth (This training is offered and made possible by the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare. Learners will know: whether Evidence-Based Treatments are efficacious for ethnic minority youth; whether minority and non-minority youth benefit equally from psychotherapy; the effectiveness of cultural adaptations when treating minority youth; the limitations of the current literature, clinical implications, and future directions. This training provides 2 hours of credit.)
      • Print out and complete the Knowledge Check. Note that a minimum of 8 of the 10 questions must be answered correctly to receive credit for this course.
  • Introduction to Infant Mental Health (This training is offered and made possible by the University of Minnesota - Center for Advanced Studies in Child Welfare. This training includes a discussion of infant mental health and how it develops. Some main principles of infant mental health are revealed along with ways in which they can be incorporated into child welfare. This training provides 1 hour of credit.)
      • Print out and complete the Knowledge Check. Note that a minimum of 8 of the 10 questions must be answered correctly to receive credit for this course.
  • Online Social Networking in the Workplace (This self-guided training is part of a series of trainings designed by students in the University of New Hampshire's Master of Social Work program and is based on current research and recognized best practices. This course is designed to inform learners of the implications of social networking in the workplace. It will provide an introductory overview of social networking as well as a description of some of the dangers of social networking use in the workplace. It will place social networking use in the context of professional ethics and the law with an emphasis on potential impediments to the maintenance of confidentiality and appropriate boundaries. It will also describe practical measures for reducing the risk of ethical lapses or personally damaging uses of social networking tools. This training provides 1 hour of credit.)
  • Peer Supervision (This self-guided PowerPoint is part of a series of trainings designed by students in the University of New Hampshire's Master of Social Work program and is based on current research and recognized best practices. This course provides an overview of peer supervision for child welfare workers. It describes the benefits of peer supervision as well as methods and techniques to improve its success. Learners will be aware of common challenges to peer supervision groups, types of peer supervision, and the specific utility of peer supervision to individuals working in child welfare. The accompanying handout describes the learning outcomes of this training. This training provides 1 hour of training credit.)
      • Please review the accompanying handout and read the supplemental notes for each slide. If you are unable to view the PowerPoint, please download the .pdf version of the training below.
      • Print out and complete the Knowledge Check. Note that a minimum of 8 of the 10 questions must be answered correctly to receive credit for this course.
  • Screening, Assessment and Triage (This training is offered and made possible by the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare and the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement. Findings and practical experience have established that no single checklist yields the kind of information caseworkers need to make difficult decisions about whether parents need substance abuse treatment and if children are safe. There is an array of screening instruments and practice principles that, if used appropriately, can provide timely information to guide those decisions. Models will be presented to help staff of public and private agencies respond to families affected by substance use disorders. This training provides 3 hours of credit.)
  • The Intersection of Domestic Violence and Child Victimization (This training is offered and made possible by the Institute for Family Violence Studies at Florida State University. This course is designed to increase one’s understanding of domestic violence and its impact on children and families. It includes a unit highlighting the barriers women living in rural communities face opposed to their urban counterparts.  The Intersection of Domestic Violence and Child Victimization also informs participants of the importance of a coordinated community response and everyone’s role in screening, identifying and referral to domestic violence services in the community as well as forming a  safety plan to compliment a Child Protection Case Plan. This training provides 3 hours of credit.)
      • Print out and complete the Knowledge Check. Note that a minimum of 8 of the 10 questions must be answered correctly to receive credit for this course.
  • Treating the Invisible Wounds of War (This training is offered and made possible by the Citizen Soldier Support Program through the Odum Institute for Research and Social Science at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill. This course is designed to help behavioral health providers and clinicans in all disciplines providers - who may see a veteran or family member on an unrelated issue - develop a better understanding of the culture in which veterans and their families live and work, and provide best practices for identifying, assessing and treating mental health disorders that result from the trauma of war. This training provides 3 hours of credit.)
      • The link for the Knowledge Check for this training is coming soon. Please contact your educational program coordinator if you have questions on how to receive credit for this training.
  • Vicarious Trauma: Caring for Our Caseworkers (This self-guided PowerPoint training - viewed as a .pdf file - is offered and made possible by the UNH Center for Professional Excellence in Child Welfare. This training will present information about the meaning of "vicarious trauma" as well as factors which may serve to exacerbate or mitigate workers' experiences of vicarious trauma. It will also describe the potential negative effects of vicarious trauma to both workers and agencies. Finally, it will examine policies and methods that may reduce the negative effects of vicarious trauma. This training provides 1 hour of credit.)
      • Please read the supplemental notes for each slide and review the 2 accompanying handouts below. 
      • Print out and complete the Knowledge Check. Note that a minimum of 8 of the 10 questions must be answered correctly to receive credit for this course.

Other Training Opportunities

The organizations linked below also offer training opportunities (webinars and/or workshops) that are available for DCYF staff to complete in order to receive training credit. Please send a copy of your training certificate and a completed Action Plan (if required) to CPE via fax (271-4737), email, or interoffice mail. If you notice any broken or expired training links, please contact Pam Seufert via email (pam.seufert@unh.edu) or call 271-4732:

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