other news

  • For significant contributions to the state and its people, the Frederick Smyth Institute of Music will receive the 2013 Granite State Award from the University of New Hampshire Manchester. The award will be presented during commencement on Thursday, May 16, 2013. 

    The Frederick Smyth Trust has supported music and the arts in New Hampshire since 1949. Marion C. Smyth founded the Smyth Trust in 1949 in memory of her husband Frederick Smyth, former New Hampshire governor (1865 to 1867) and four-term mayor of the City of Manchester (1852 to 1854 and 1863 to 1864). 

    Frederick and Marion Smyth shared a love of music. In her will, Smyth established the trust to bring music to the people of Manchester and the state of New Hampshire through cultural and musical programs and through scholarships to support students’ collegiate pursuit of their love of music. 

    The Smyth legacy lives on through annual grant funding to UNH Manchester and other...

  • Jeff SohlThe angel investor market in 2012 continued the upward trend started in 2010 in investment dollars and in the number of investments, albeit at a moderate pace, according to the 2012 Angel Market Analysis released by the Center for Venture Research at UNH.

    Total investments in 2012 were $22.9 billion, an increase of 1.8 percent over 2011 when investments totaled $22.5 billion. A total of 67,030 entrepreneurial ventures received angel funding in 2012, an increase of 1.2 percent over 2011 investments, and the number of active investors in 2012 was 268,160 individuals, a decline of 15.8 percent from 2011.

    “The small increase in both total dollars and the number of investments resulted in a deal size for 2012 that was virtually unchanged from 2011. These data indicate that while fewer angels were active...

  • UNH will celebrate the 25th year of the Paul J. Holloway Prize Innovation-to-Market competition – the oldest business plan competition in the state and one of the first in the nation – Wednesday, May 8, 2013, as students compete in the championship round of the competition.

    This year the stakes are the highest they have ever been, with six teams vying for cash and other prizes valued at more than $75,000, including the grand prize of $25,000, which is more than double the prize amount of previous first-place winners. 

    “For 25 years, the Holloway Prize Competition has allowed our students to test their ingenuity and business acumen in the real-world situation of developing and presenting a business plan,” said Daniel Innis, dean of the Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics. “As the Granite State’s first business plan competition, the Holloway Prize Competition has a long track record of supporting the next generation of entrepreneurs. We...

  • I.  Roll – The following senators were absent:  Baldwin, Connelly, Fagerberg, Harrist, Hartter, Minocha, Scherr, Shore, Simos, Whistler, and Woods.  A guest was John Aber.

    II.  Remarks by and questions to the provost – The provost thanked the senate for approving the proposal for the marine school.  He also said that the senate chair and vice chair will meet with the deans on April 16 to discuss the report of the Professional Standards Committee on the impact of non-tenure-track faculty on tenure-track faculty and governance activities.  The provost suggested that the Faculty Senate might discuss representation for non-tenure-track faculty.  A senator asked if non-tenure-track faculty should communicate their questions or concerns with their governance council which would communicate with the provost; and the provost agreed and added that the...

  • Paul Kirshen. Photo by Kristi Donahue, UNH-EOS.

    Among other things blown away by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 was the notion that climate change was a thing of the future and that humanity had plenty of breathing room before having to gear up against its onslaught.

    "Sandy really changed the landscape and caused a step increase in climate change adaptation thinking," says research professor Paul Kirshen.

    At least that's what Kirshen, a civil engineer with joint appointments at EOS and the UNH department of civil engineering, is seeing in his line of work.

    For example, Kirshen has ongoing climate change adaptation projects underway in the Boston area but after Sandy immediately saw evidence of that step change...

  • Goldwater award winners
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  • team riders

    Members of UNH’s Intercollegiate Hunt Seat Association (IHSA) equestrian team won the Zone I Team Reserve Championship. Left to right: Coach Christina Keim, ’98,’09G, Sarah Elizabeth Bassett ‘13; Kate-lyn Gadoua ’15, Lauren DeJoie ’15, Karlee Burmaster ’16, Elise Daly ’16, Sara Barone ’14.
    ...
  • Melinda Negron-Gonzales, assistant professor of the Politics and Society program at UNH Manchester, is the recipient of the college’s 2013 Faculty Excellence Award. Negron-Gonzales will be recognized at UNH Manchester’s 28th annual commencement ceremony Thursday, May 16.

    UNH’s Faculty Excellence Award recognizes a residential faculty member who is an inspiring, challenging, and effective teacher whose support and respect for students is evident both in and out of the classroom. The positive comments from students’, faculty and staff in the nomination process set Melinda Negron-Gonzales apart in a field of gifted colleagues.

    Since joining UNH in 2008, Negron-Gonzales has garnered praise for her enthusiasm and brilliant teaching skills. She consistently puts her students’ needs first. As one student clearly noted in a course evaluation, “Professor Negrón-Gonzales was extremely enthusiastic and encouraged debate and lively discussion, which made her classes...

  • When professor David Ripley’s son was 3, the child fell asleep upon the couch in a timber-frame house his father was building for the family. As Ripley looked down upon his son that day curled up, he said to himself, "My God, if I could put that into a song." Later that day, the lyric came to him. 

    Ripley, a professor of music who specializes in voice and opera, recorded the original composition, “The Sleeping of a Child,” on his 1990 "Mustard Seed, Songs of Faith" recording. For many years, he thought about arranging it for choir, but never did -- until the tragedy in Newtown, Conn. 

    “I had to respond in some way to this horrific event. That was the catalyst for my decision to arrange the song for the UNH Concert Choir, which I will be directing this spring while their regular conductor, Bill Kempster, is on leave. This, I hope, will be a response, among others I am sure, from the entire UNH community to the tragedy of the Newtown massacre,” Ripley says...

  • Dozens of students have taken over the Hennessy Theatre. Faculty are not allowed. Only a few days remain before opening night of a major department of theatre and dance production. No matter what happens, they and only they are responsible. For the first time in nearly two decades, students are producing the Undergraduate Prize Plays (UPPs), a department program in which students write, direct, perform, and design their own plays without faculty supervision.

     The UPPs used to be a department institution. Running from the mid-’70s to mid-’90s, they provided generations of students valuable experience in independently creating theatre from blank page to final performance. But the program was discontinued in 1996 due to a lack of resources, a loss felt keenly by some who had experienced its benefits first-hand. One of those beneficiaries decided to do something about it. UPP alumnus Mike O’Malley ’88 hatched a plan with professor emeritus of theatre John Edwards, who...

  • The state of New Hampshire is in good civic health, ranking higher than the national average on several key indicators such as voter turnout, engaging in political discussions, contacting public officials, volunteering, and charitable giving, according to new research from the Carsey Institute at UNH.

     The new research is presented in the Carsey Institute report “2012 New Hampshire Civic Health Index” in partnership with the National Conference on Citizenship, The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, Campus Compact for New Hampshire, the University System of New Hampshire, and the New Hampshire College & University Council. The research was conducted by Bruce Mallory, interim director of the Carsey Institute and professor of education at UNH, and Quixada Moore-Vissing, a doctoral student in education at UNH and a graduate research assistant at the Carsey Institute....

  • Jack Resch, professor of history and coordinator the humanities program at UNH Manchester, has been named the recipient of the University’s Distinguished Professor Award.

    The purpose of the award is to identify and honor longstanding members of the UNH faculty who have distinguished themselves in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service. This is the only university-wide award given each year to the faculty member whose overall record of excellent teaching, caring about students, devotion to the university community, and substantial record of scholarly achievement exemplifies a distinguished career.

    Resch has been a faculty member at UNH for 40 years. He is the recipient of two Fulbright awards and several fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities. In 2001 he received the university’s Alumni Affairs Award for Excellence in Public Service. Resch has served as president of the board of directors of the World Affairs Council of New Hampshire,...

  • Migration to and from different parts of the United States has become adriving force underlying population redistribution in the United States. New research from the Carsey Institute at UNH on age-related migration patterns provides a fuller understanding of the complex patterns of demographic change in the United States.

    The new research is summarized in the Carsey Institute brief “Age and Lifecycle Patterns Driving U.S. Migration Shifts,” coauthored by Kenneth Johnson, senior demographer at the Carsey Institute and professor of sociology, and his colleagues Richelle Winkler, assistant professor of sociology and demography at Michigan Technological University, and Luke Rogers, a research assistant at the Carsey Institute and a doctoral student in sociology.

    “These migration patterns have important implications for people, institutions, and communities of both rural and urban America, as well as for the design of policies and practices that foster the development of...

  • The Sustainability Institute at UNH can now work with high school teachers and community college faculty in the state and region to design sustainability curricula for their classrooms with a $50,000 grant from the Verizon Foundation. Participating schools include Farmington, Salem, and Goffstown high schools; Manchester, Nashua, and Great Bay community colleges; and New Hampshire Technical Institute. 

    The Sustainability Learning Collaboratives will link UNH education faculty with community colleges and high schools with large under-served populations (ethnically and socioeconomically), engaging them during the course of 2013 in curriculum development and professional studies. In addition, teachers and faculty will develop new teaching methods and assessment strategies reflecting the principles of sustainability.  

    “UNH is a great public university, with a visionary Sustainability Institute,” says Paula Salvio, professor of education, a faculty fellow at...

  • The Peace Corps and UNH have teamed up to launch a Paul D. Coverdell Fellows Program partnership, an initiative that provides graduate school scholarships to returned Peace Corps volunteers who wish to pursue a Master of Arts in development policy and practice.

    “The Peace Corps is delighted to have the University of New Hampshire as a partner in the Paul D. Coverdell Fellows Program,” said Carrie Hessler-Radelet, acting Peace Corps director. “This new partnership enables returned Peace Corps volunteers to continue their work in public service through meaningful internships in underserved American communities. Experience overseas and graduate studies position Peace Corps Fellows to launch a career by combining coursework with service.” 

    Fellows selected for the Coverdell program will receive between $1,000 and $2,000 tuition scholarships for the summer, fall, and spring semesters that can be applied to the cost of the Master of Arts in Development Policy and...