other news

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    Summer Cook and

    Madeline Allen ’14 (left)Summer Cook, assistant professor of exercise science, right. *(Center: unidentified research subject.

    To build strength in elderly adults, UNH researcher Summer Cook has a secret weapon: youth. Specifically, Madeline Allen ’14, who is helping Cook gather data as part of a three-year, $360,000 National Institutes for Health grant and, with support from the Grimes Family Fund, conducting her own research.

    Cook credits the study’s unheard-of 100 percent compliance rate by its subjects, who range in age from 65 to 90, to the connections they’ve made with Allen and other undergraduates working on the project. “The older adults are having a great time, and I think it’...

  • I.  Roll – The following senators were absent:  Baldwin, Connelly, Guo, Harrist, Jonas, Kaen, Kazura, LaRoche, Mebert, Minocha, Safford, Shannon and Simos.  Guests were John Aber and Christina Bellinger.

    II.  Remarks by and questions to the provost – The provost said that, on the issue of Thompson School course renumbering, there have been some very good conversations among the COLSA dean, the Thompson School faculty, and the provost.  He added that the senate chair and vice chair will speak with the Deans’ Council tomorrow, about the proportion of tenure-track faculty.  The provost recently spoke with the Lecturers’ Council.  Today he expressed the hope that the Faculty Senate would include the different types of non-tenure-track faculty in the Faculty Senate.

    III.  Remarks by and questions...

  • Nigerian educators

    Photo L to R: Ajayi Samuel Olufemi of the Federal College of Education in Oyo, Elizabeth Humphreys of the UNH Institute on Disability, Ojuawo Matthew Bamidele of the Federal College of Education in Oyo, Ogechi Ohadomere of the Zamarr Institute, Mike Omotosho of the Sustainable Healthcare Initiative, Leslie Couse and Justus Ogembo of the UNH department of education. Courtesy photo.

    The UNH department of education recently hosted colleagues from Nigeria who work in the area of special education to share best practices and improve education and services for children with disabilities in Nigeria....

  • U.S. lodging executives were less optimistic about general business conditions in March than the prior month, according to the UNH Lodging Executives Sentiment Index (LESI) for the current month ending March 2013. The index decreased from 72.6 in February 2013 to 68.8 in March 2013.  

    “This decrease results from lodging executives’ less-than-positive opinions of the present general business conditions for their properties and for general business conditions 12 months in the future. However, they were cautiously optimistic about expectations for room reservations looking forward 12months,” said Nelson Barber, associate professor of hospitality management, who manages the index. 

    Forty-four percent of lodging executives indicated current business conditions were good, a decline from 52 percent last period, while 56 percent indicated conditions were normal, up from 43 percent during the same period. None of the executives indicated such conditions were bad,...

  • For significant contributions to the state and its people, the Frederick Smyth Institute of Music will receive the 2013 Granite State Award from the University of New Hampshire Manchester. The award will be presented during commencement on Thursday, May 16, 2013. 

    The Frederick Smyth Trust has supported music and the arts in New Hampshire since 1949. Marion C. Smyth founded the Smyth Trust in 1949 in memory of her husband Frederick Smyth, former New Hampshire governor (1865 to 1867) and four-term mayor of the City of Manchester (1852 to 1854 and 1863 to 1864). 

    Frederick and Marion Smyth shared a love of music. In her will, Smyth established the trust to bring music to the people of Manchester and the state of New Hampshire through cultural and musical programs and through scholarships to support students’ collegiate pursuit of their love of music. 

    The Smyth legacy lives on through annual grant funding to UNH Manchester and other...

  • Jeff SohlThe angel investor market in 2012 continued the upward trend started in 2010 in investment dollars and in the number of investments, albeit at a moderate pace, according to the 2012 Angel Market Analysis released by the Center for Venture Research at UNH.

    Total investments in 2012 were $22.9 billion, an increase of 1.8 percent over 2011 when investments totaled $22.5 billion. A total of 67,030 entrepreneurial ventures received angel funding in 2012, an increase of 1.2 percent over 2011 investments, and the number of active investors in 2012 was 268,160 individuals, a decline of 15.8 percent from 2011.

    “The small increase in both total dollars and the number of investments resulted in a deal size for 2012 that was virtually unchanged from 2011. These data indicate that while fewer angels were active...

  • UNH will celebrate the 25th year of the Paul J. Holloway Prize Innovation-to-Market competition – the oldest business plan competition in the state and one of the first in the nation – Wednesday, May 8, 2013, as students compete in the championship round of the competition.

    This year the stakes are the highest they have ever been, with six teams vying for cash and other prizes valued at more than $75,000, including the grand prize of $25,000, which is more than double the prize amount of previous first-place winners. 

    “For 25 years, the Holloway Prize Competition has allowed our students to test their ingenuity and business acumen in the real-world situation of developing and presenting a business plan,” said Daniel Innis, dean of the Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics. “As the Granite State’s first business plan competition, the Holloway Prize Competition has a long track record of supporting the next generation of entrepreneurs. We...

  • I.  Roll – The following senators were absent:  Baldwin, Connelly, Fagerberg, Harrist, Hartter, Minocha, Scherr, Shore, Simos, Whistler, and Woods.  A guest was John Aber.

    II.  Remarks by and questions to the provost – The provost thanked the senate for approving the proposal for the marine school.  He also said that the senate chair and vice chair will meet with the deans on April 16 to discuss the report of the Professional Standards Committee on the impact of non-tenure-track faculty on tenure-track faculty and governance activities.  The provost suggested that the Faculty Senate might discuss representation for non-tenure-track faculty.  A senator asked if non-tenure-track faculty should communicate their questions or concerns with their governance council which would communicate with the provost; and the provost agreed and added that the...

  • Paul Kirshen. Photo by Kristi Donahue, UNH-EOS.

    Among other things blown away by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 was the notion that climate change was a thing of the future and that humanity had plenty of breathing room before having to gear up against its onslaught.

    "Sandy really changed the landscape and caused a step increase in climate change adaptation thinking," says research professor Paul Kirshen.

    At least that's what Kirshen, a civil engineer with joint appointments at EOS and the UNH department of civil engineering, is seeing in his line of work.

    For example, Kirshen has ongoing climate change adaptation projects underway in the Boston area but after Sandy immediately saw evidence of that step change...

  • Goldwater award winners
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  • team riders

    Members of UNH’s Intercollegiate Hunt Seat Association (IHSA) equestrian team won the Zone I Team Reserve Championship. Left to right: Coach Christina Keim, ’98,’09G, Sarah Elizabeth Bassett ‘13; Kate-lyn Gadoua ’15, Lauren DeJoie ’15, Karlee Burmaster ’16, Elise Daly ’16, Sara Barone ’14.
    ...
  • Melinda Negron-Gonzales, assistant professor of the Politics and Society program at UNH Manchester, is the recipient of the college’s 2013 Faculty Excellence Award. Negron-Gonzales will be recognized at UNH Manchester’s 28th annual commencement ceremony Thursday, May 16.

    UNH’s Faculty Excellence Award recognizes a residential faculty member who is an inspiring, challenging, and effective teacher whose support and respect for students is evident both in and out of the classroom. The positive comments from students’, faculty and staff in the nomination process set Melinda Negron-Gonzales apart in a field of gifted colleagues.

    Since joining UNH in 2008, Negron-Gonzales has garnered praise for her enthusiasm and brilliant teaching skills. She consistently puts her students’ needs first. As one student clearly noted in a course evaluation, “Professor Negrón-Gonzales was extremely enthusiastic and encouraged debate and lively discussion, which made her classes...

  • When professor David Ripley’s son was 3, the child fell asleep upon the couch in a timber-frame house his father was building for the family. As Ripley looked down upon his son that day curled up, he said to himself, "My God, if I could put that into a song." Later that day, the lyric came to him. 

    Ripley, a professor of music who specializes in voice and opera, recorded the original composition, “The Sleeping of a Child,” on his 1990 "Mustard Seed, Songs of Faith" recording. For many years, he thought about arranging it for choir, but never did -- until the tragedy in Newtown, Conn. 

    “I had to respond in some way to this horrific event. That was the catalyst for my decision to arrange the song for the UNH Concert Choir, which I will be directing this spring while their regular conductor, Bill Kempster, is on leave. This, I hope, will be a response, among others I am sure, from the entire UNH community to the tragedy of the Newtown massacre,” Ripley says...

  • Dozens of students have taken over the Hennessy Theatre. Faculty are not allowed. Only a few days remain before opening night of a major department of theatre and dance production. No matter what happens, they and only they are responsible. For the first time in nearly two decades, students are producing the Undergraduate Prize Plays (UPPs), a department program in which students write, direct, perform, and design their own plays without faculty supervision.

     The UPPs used to be a department institution. Running from the mid-’70s to mid-’90s, they provided generations of students valuable experience in independently creating theatre from blank page to final performance. But the program was discontinued in 1996 due to a lack of resources, a loss felt keenly by some who had experienced its benefits first-hand. One of those beneficiaries decided to do something about it. UPP alumnus Mike O’Malley ’88 hatched a plan with professor emeritus of theatre John Edwards, who...

  • The state of New Hampshire is in good civic health, ranking higher than the national average on several key indicators such as voter turnout, engaging in political discussions, contacting public officials, volunteering, and charitable giving, according to new research from the Carsey Institute at UNH.

     The new research is presented in the Carsey Institute report “2012 New Hampshire Civic Health Index” in partnership with the National Conference on Citizenship, The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, Campus Compact for New Hampshire, the University System of New Hampshire, and the New Hampshire College & University Council. The research was conducted by Bruce Mallory, interim director of the Carsey Institute and professor of education at UNH, and Quixada Moore-Vissing, a doctoral student in education at UNH and a graduate research assistant at the Carsey Institute....