Other News

  • Learning – and great eating – doesn’t need to stop this summer, when a new series of cooking classes at the Thompson School of Applied Science introduces adult learners to a wide range of cuisines and culinary techniques. From “Mindful Cuisines” to bakery classics, gluten-free to grilling, the classes tap the Thompson School’s professional facilities and culinary arts faculty. 

    Classes start on June 5 and run through July 19, 2013, from 6 to 9 p.m. on Wednesdays and Fridays; the fee is $65 per class.  

    “These courses offer adults the chance to learn valuable skills and recipes they can use in a professional kitchen under the guidance of a professional chef,” says Julienne Guyette, chef and a lecturer in the Thompson School’s culinary arts program. “And, of course, everyone enjoys eating what they cook.” 

    “We’ve had requests for this type of class for a long time, so we’re pleased to be able to offer these courses,” adds Thompson School director...

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    UNH Center for Family Business 2013 Leadership Development graduates.

    Front row: Peter Goedecke, Goedecke Flooring & Design, Bedford; Kristin Makris, Makris Lobster & Steak House, Concord; Brandi Coulter, Skillings and Sons, Amherst; Grant Kelly, New Hampshire Distributors, Concord.

    Back row: Blaine Davis, HR Clough, Contoocook; Ben Huntington, Pleasant View Gardens, Loudon; Bryan Savoie, A.J. LeBlanc Heating, Bedford; Warren Daigle, Daigle Plumbing & Heating, Derry; Jeff Daigle, Daigle Plumbing & Heating, Derry; Vanessa Drusak, associate professor of organizational behavior and management, UNH Peter T. Paul College of Business & Economics. 

  • monitor stand

     

    The AT Pad Stand, created by University of New Hampshire professor Therese Willkomm, has received UNH’s first design patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

    Credit: UNH Office for Research Partnerships and Commercialization.

     

     

    A fully flexible, portable stand for tablet computers has received UNH’s first-ever design patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Professor Therese Willkomm, often called the “MacGyver” of assistive technology, originally created the AT (...

  • The names of three soldiers who lost their lives while serving their country will be added to the War Memorial in the Memorial Union Building Thursday, May 23, at 10 a.m. The public is invited to attend.

    Located on the third floor of the MUB, the Memorial Room honors all New Hampshire residents from World War I through the present who died in military action.

    Sgt John A. Lyons, 26, originally from Peterborough, lost his life Oct. 26, 2011, while serving his country on active duty in Ghazni Province, Afghanistan. Lyons was assigned to the 8th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas. 

    Sgt 1st Class Ryan J. Savard, 29, originally from Jefferson, died Oct.13, 2012, from small arms fire while on patrol during combat operations in the Khanabad District, Afghanistan. Savard was assigned to headquarters and headquarters company, U.S. Army Special Operations Command at Fort Bragg, NC. 

    Capt. Shawn G. Hogan, 28, of Salem, died Oct....

  • Last year, UNH’s “fleet” – the 300-plus transit and non-transit vehicles on campus – traveled a total of 1.6 million miles, racking up more than $624,000 in fuel costs and emitting 1,500 tons of carbon dioxide, the equivalent of 18 tanker trucks filled with gasoline or the electricity used in one year by more than 200 homes. 

    Now, a new tool will help UNH departments and offices make wise fiscal and environmental choices when purchasing new vehicles – or not.

    The ECOCat Vehicle Selection Calculator, released in May by a team that includes UNH Facilities Campus Planning in collaboration with transportation services, purchasing, and the Sustainability Institute, is a spreadsheet tool that incorporates vehicle price, miles per gallon (MPG), and greenhouse gas emissions to represent the full life cycle and environmental costs of selecting vehicle ownership. An ...

  • Don Graves

    Don Graves, author of “Writing: Teachers & Children at Work.”

    Up until Donald Graves’ pioneering work on literacy, the idea that young children should think of themselves as writers, much less even be able to write, was unheard of. That changed in 1983 when the UNH professor changed the way writing is taught across the United States and the English-speaking world with the publication of “Writing: Teachers & Children at Work.”

    Graves’ book was based on a two-year study of elementary school children at Atkinson Academy in Atkinson. His research revealed writing as a natural human need for self-expression and a way to develop and hone critical thinking skills.

    “...

  • Cooperative Extension and the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture invites the public to a Community Tree Farm Field Day on June 1 from 9 a.m. – 3:45 p.m. in the UNH woodlands. The field day will feature long and short tours, demonstrations, lectures, and lunch.  

    “It’s a great opportunity to experience these working forests,” says forester Steve Eisenhaure, land use coordinator in the Office of Woodlands and Natural Areas.  

    Experts from UNH, Cooperative Extension, and the New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands will guide participants through the inner workings of several field sites, including a three-acre insectary where beetles that feed on the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid will be raised as a biological control; a New England cottontail habitat tract; a woodlot that supplies bedding for UNH Organic Dairy cows...

  • Stacy VanDeveer, associate professor of political science, participated in the event "Backdraft: The Conflict Potential of Climate Mitigation and Adaptation" at the Wilson Center  in Washington, D.C. Thursday, May 16, 2013.  

    Amid the growing number of reports warning that climate change threatens security, one potentially dangerous—but counterintuitive—dimension has been largely ignored. Could efforts to reduce our carbon footprint and lower our vulnerability to climate change inadvertently exacerbate existing conflicts? How do we ensure mitigation and adaptation strategies do not create new conflicts?  How can policymakers anticipate and minimize these potential risks?  More ambitiously, can these efforts actually help build peace?   

    "Backdraft: The Conflict Potential of Climate Mitigation and Adaptation" gathered leading environmental security experts to analyze these underexplored aspects of responding to climate change....

  • U.S. lodging executives’ sentiment about general business conditions was flat in April compared to the prior month, according to the UNH Lodging Executives Sentiment Index (LESI) for the month ending April 2013. The index showed little growth to 69.3 from 68.8 in March 2013.  

    “These results are from lodging executives’ sentiment of the present general business conditions for their properties that continued downward, offset by their sentiment for how they view general business conditions 12 months in the future and by higher expectations about room reservations over the same 12-month period,” said Nelson Barber, associate professor of hospitality management, who manages the index.  

    Nineteen percent of lodging executives indicated current business conditions were good, a decline from 44 percent from February, while 77 percent indicated conditions were normal, up from 56 percent during February. Four percent of the executives indicated such conditions...

  • Xiaowei Teng, assistant professor of chemical engineeringXiaowei Teng, assistant professor of chemical engineering, has received an Early Career Research Award from the U.S. Department of Energy to pursue research that will improve the ability to store energy in supercapacitors. The award, of $750,000 over five years, is one of just 61 that went to researchers from universities and national laboratories; it was chosen from about 770 proposals. 

    Teng’s work aims to fill a void in the energy storage field, particularly related to electric vehicles. Electric vehicles currently use lithium-ion batteries to store the energy needed to run them; the long charging time of these batteries has proved to be a major barrier in the development of electric vehicle technology. 

    “If you pump gas into an 18-gallon car, it only...

  • UNH is committed to improving the health of its faculty, staff, and student population through the work of Healthy UNH, and to making UNH the healthiest campus community in the country by 2020.  

    In honor Employee Health and Fitness Month, Healthy UNH offers the following tip:  

    1. Take your meeting on-the-go. Rather than sitting in a conference room or meeting for coffee, go for a walk or run. Keep a spare pair of sneakers at your work station and you will always be prepared. Campus Rec provides several options for walking and running routes on their website.
    2. Stop to smell the flowers. Take a break from your computer screen and de-stress with a short break outside. The UNH Tree Walk Podcast can help you learn to appreciate the great outdoors.
    3. Eat locally. The...
  • The annual staff recognition luncheon was held May 1 honoring 199 employees who together have 3,605 years of service.  

    Included were staff members who have worked at UNH 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 years.  

    During the celebration, President Mark Huddleston presented the 2013 Presidential Award of Excellence to this year's five award recipients.   

     staff with 40 years of service

    Staff who have been here 40 years: (l to r) James Williams, CEPS, department of physics; Edward Ricker, UNH Dining; Diana Couture, Office of the Vice Provost for Research; Marlene Norton, COLSA, natural resources and the...

  • UNH Cooperative Extension continues its “Issues and Ice Cream” series May 22 at the Chase Ocean Engineering building.

     Faculty, staff and students are invited to learn more about “UNH and the STEM Workforce: What is Our Role?”

    The presentation and discussion, from 12:30 to 2 p.m., will focus on efforts at UNH and throughout New Hampshire to address science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) literacy and how to build a STEM-literate workforce.  

    Join your colleagues from UNH Cooperative Extension, New Hampshire Sea Grant, the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, and other campus departments to:

    • share what you and your program do,
    • learn about the SeaPerch program,
    • find out about STEM-NH, a statewide effort to facilitate collaboration among STEM programs to increase their impact,
    • hear about the ways that animal science excites kids about STEM in 4-H—the youth development program of Cooperative...
  • Spend an afternoon at Concord’s Dimond Hill Farm Sunday, June 2, 2013, at a farm day event to benefit NH Farm to School, a project of UNH's Sustainability Institute that connects New Hampshire farms with local schools. The free event, from noon – 4 p.m., will feature music, food, and educational opportunities. 

    “What better way to celebrate spring and connect with local food and farmers than by spending a day on a working farm,” says Stacey Purslow, NH Farm to School coordinator. 

    Highlights of the day include a performance by Lakes Region singer/songwriter Don Watson and educational presentations addressing a range of agricultural topics from bees to soil to llamas. Food from The Soup Guy will be available for sale. While the farm day is free, NH Farm to School will accept donations; in addition, proceeds from a raffle and from sales of locally made ice cream will benefit the organization. 

    Dimond Hill Farm (...

  •  New Hampshire Sea Grant and Cooperative Extension coastal ecosystems specialist Alyson Eberhardt.

    Alyson Eberhardt, NHSG/UNHCE coastal ecosystems specialist, discusses plant identification with volunteers as part of their phenology training.

    Citizen scientists in southeastern N.H. are documenting small-scale impacts of climate change in their backyards and neighborhoods. Equipped with pencils and data sheets or simply an app on their mobile device, these volunteers will meticulously record the dates of seemingly innocuous events: What date the tree buds open up, when chipmunks begin scurrying through the yard, and when blackbirds begin nesting in nearby marshes.

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