UNH Showcases Technologies for Innovators and Investors at Tech Summit

UNH Showcases Technologies for Innovators and Investors at Tech Summit

Monday, May 13, 2013

UNH will present three technologies developed here to some of the world’s leading innovators and investors this week, as representatives from the Office for Research Partnerships and Commercialization showcase them at the TechConnect WORLD Summit in Washington, D.C.  

UNH will share its expertise with projects that detect radiation from a safe distance, integrate complex situational data into a visual Web-based image, and produce a class of compounds that are highly stable organic semiconductors.  

“This is an opportunity to showcase UNH innovations from a number of fields to technology business developers and funders, potential corporate partners, and federal laboratories and agencies,” says Maria Emanuel, ORPC senior licensing manager. “We’re hoping to get exposure not only for these specific technologies but for UNH as an innovator.”  

The team’s ultimate goal is to identify potential licensees who could take these technologies to market. This marks the first time UNH has participated in TechConnect WORLD. 

 James Ryan, professor in the Space Science Center at EOS

James Ryan, professor in the Space Science Center at EOS. 

At the four-day summit, UNH will showcase NSPECT, a portable neutron and gamma-ray imaging spectrometer developed by James Ryan, professor in the Space Science Center at EOS; ERMA, a Web-based data visualization program originally developed for environmental and natural disasters, developed by professor of civil and environmental engineering Nancy Kinner and Research Computing & Instrumentation Center in partnership with NOAA; and high-performance organic semiconductors for flexible electronics, developed by professor of chemistry and director of the UNH materials science program Glen Miller. 

Glen Miller, professor of chemistry and director of the UNH materials science program

Glen Miller, professor of chemistry and director of the UNH materials science program.

In addition, NSPECT was selected for an oral presentation and was recognized as a TechConnect Innovation Awardee, an honor given to projects that place in the top 20 percent of all submitted technologies as ranked by the TechConnect Corporate & Investment Partner Committee.  

NSPECT (short for Portable Neutron Spectroscope) leverages techniques from modern astrophysics – radiation imaging and spectroscopy that discerns whether a radiation source is benign or threatening – to detect radioactive materials that could pose a threat to homeland security from a safe distance. Based on instruments designed and built at UNH for space-based missions that study high-energy neutrons and gamma rays from the Sun, NSPECT was developed in partnership with the Michigan Aerospace Corporation under a Small Business Innovation Research contract from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. 

ERMA® (Environmental Response Management Application) made its public debut during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, when it emerged as a one-stop shop for information about the spill and its impact. During the spill, ERMA incorporated data from a range of sources -- NOAA, Homeland Security, the Coast Guard, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, and NASA among them – to provide a user-friendly, constantly updated source of information. In addition to Kinner, director of the UNH/NOAA Coastal Response Research Center, RCI director Patrick Messer and programmers Philip Collins and Robert St. Lawrence developed ERMA, which was used in White House briefings and has received several awards. 

Glen Miller has developed a class of organic semiconductors that are highly stable, making them uniquely suited for high-rate, low-cost manufacturing processes like high-speed printing and spray coating. The proprietary “acene” structure of these organic semiconductors makes them resistant to oxidation and able to be heated to 400 degrees Celsius. They show promise for use in organic LEDs and photovoltaics, flexible electronics, and RFID tags; lighting, medical device, defense and telecommunications are among the potential markets.